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COM357: Professional Business Communication: Finding Sources

Keywords and Subjects aren't the same thing?

Keywords are simply those words you type into the search box to get the results you want. Just like in Google, you don't type your whole question, just the important words or terms that will help you get the answers. Remember to consider synonyms when you create your keyword list.

So what are subjects then? Subjects are a specific word or phrase some librarian has assigned to a particular topic. Basically it's a tag we attach to articles or books. Why would we do that? Because that way when you search for that specific word or phrase you get EVERYTHING that has been tagged with that term. You can find these subjects (or subject headings) in the library catalog and most databases (except JSTOR). Usually they live along the left side bar or in the middle of the record (when you click on a specific book or article).

Databases for Business & Communication

Many of these databases contain publications from resources other than scholarly journals. Magazines, industry profiles, trade publications, and books are just a few of the formats.

Keyword v. Subject Example

Want a real life example of keywords? Let's look at nicknames and Facebook.  Let's say a bunch of your friends decide to upload photos on Facebook. Now each of these friends calls you by a different nickname. So they tag you in them by whatever they call you. In order to see all of these pics, you'd have to search for each of your nicknames to find them.

Subjects on the other hand are like your actual given name. Or at least your Facebook official name. Now when you actually tag photos on Facebook, you know you're forced to tag them with their "actual" name. And while it may be less personal or descriptive, you do get all the photos of you when you use the offical name tag.

Tools for Facilitating Group Work

OneDrive: online versions of Microsoft Word, Excel, etc. allowing sharing & collaborative work. Available through your UD email. Once logged into your UD email account, choose the gird boxes in the upper left and select the applicable program. Log into Office365 and start your document. To share with collaborators, select Share and invite them using their UD email addresses, setting permissions as appropriate.

Google Drive (formerly Google Docs): free online software that allows you to share documents and collaboratively work on them. Includes comments feature and most word processing features. Sharing works similarly to OneDrive.

Finding Books

Don't forget, you don't need to use the whole book. Want to use just a chapter? Let us scan it for you. Fill out this form and bring it and the book up to the front (circulation) desk and we'll scan it and email it to you.

UD Catalog

Enter term(s)

Advanced Search

Where do I find these books in the library?

Once you find a book in the catalog, you need to look at 3 different things to figure out where to find the book.

First: Look at the status (in the blue box)--Is your book Available or Checked out?

Second: Determine what collection (in the purple box)--Which floor is the book on?

Third: Write down the call number (in the green box)--This call number is like the book's address. You need the whole thing.

This book, for example, is on the shelf in the UD Fiction Collection in back corner of the first floor.

This one is also on the first floor, but in the Circulating Collection which is the tall shelves on the first floor. You know it's the first floor and not the third floor because the Call Number starts with BF which is between A-K, not L-Z.

The second floor of the library, also known as the Curriculum Library, is where all the children's and young adult books are. You can tell this one is a young adult book due to the YA in the call number. The Curriculum Library is divided into different sections. The YA section is closer to the public computers and the ASC.

The New Books shelf of the Curriculum Library are located on the front shelf closest to the stairs.