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SOC335: Social Research: Quantitative Research

Government Statistics

State and federal government agencies are a great place to find quantitative data on your topic. Here are a few general websites, as well as some topic specific sites to try.

Assessment Questions

Becky's in-class presentation

Google Advanced Search for Statistics

Citations

Bernstein, N. (2014). The things they carry: Juvenile reentry. In Burning Down the House: The End of Juvenile Prison (pp. 181-197). New York, NY: The New Press.

 

Miller, A. A., Therrien, W. J., & Romig, J. E. (2019). Reducing recidivism: Transition and reentry practices for detained and adjudicated youth with disabilities. Education & Treatment of Children, 42(3), 409–438.

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Government Reports (APA)

Government Reports (APA)

Author, A. A. (year of publication). Title of publication (Report number). Retrieved from http://xxxxxxx

Example:

U.S. report from the Preschool Curriculum Evaluation Research Initiative (Report No. NCER 20082009REV). Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pub id=NCER20082009rev Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences. (2008). Effects of preschool curriculum programs on school readiness:

Finding an article full-text from a citation

  1. Determine what kind of source it is. Is it a book chapter? A journal article? (Easiest way to do this is to look for a volume or issue number. Then you know it's a journal article!)
  2. If it is a book, look in the catalog to see if we own it. If we don't, you need to Interlibrary Loan it. Do so by checking the "Libraries Worldwide" link on the left, and clicking "Request Copy."
  3. If it is an article, use the Journal List to search for the journal title to see which database it is in. If we don't own it, use Find It to request the title. If it's not in a database, use Interlibrary Loan to request the article.

Fletcher, G. P. (1998). The Fall and Rise of Criminal Theory. Buffalo Criminal Law Review1(2), 275-294.