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SCJ231: Criminology: Home

The Paper

Define--Theory

  • History
  • Origins
  • Significant Changes 
  • Individuals
  • Processes to explain crime

Summarize--Research

  • Major articles 
  • New articles

Apply--Implications

  • Application to the real world

Citations

Here are a few links to help you out with your APA citations.

Reference and background materials

Finding the articles

How to find an article full-text from a citation

  1. Determine what kind of source it is. Is it a book chapter? A journal article? 
  2. If it is a book, look in the catalog or WorldCat to see if we own it or if you need to Interlibrary Loan it.
  3. If it is an article, use the Journal List to search for the journal title to see which database it is in. If we don't own it, use Find It to request the title. If it's not in a database, use Interlibrary Loan to request the article.

Fletcher, G. P. (1998). The Fall and Rise of Criminal Theory. Buffalo Criminal Law Review, 1(2), 275-294.

Subject Guide

Sarah Slaughter's picture
Sarah Slaughter
Contact:
Charles C. Myers Library, room 219
sslaughter@dbq.edu
(563) 589-3645

Strategies

Do the easy stuff first. Find out about your theory, the history, the people first.

Then search for the current or new articles about your theory. Remember to use "quotes around the phrase" or do a subject search for the theory.

Once you've got a good pile of the contemporary stuff, you should dig through the literature review section and bibliography to see what articles get cited a lot. Those are your classics. 

Take the citations of the classics and find the full-text via the library.